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Tag Archives: cooking

'Babish' expands as pandemic boosts YouTube cooking shows

NEW YORK (AP) — Mac and cheese, 18th-century style. A seven-course meal using only ingredients from a convenience store. A meal that is literally on fire.
Four episodes into her new YouTube show, “Stump Sohla,” part of the expanding “Babish Culinary Universe” channel, Sohla El-Waylly has yet to be stumped by a food challenge.
El-Waylly became a familiar face on YouTube as a standout on Bon Appetit’s test kitchen channel. But during the nationwide racial reckoning following the police killing of George Floyd, she was among members of the test kitchen who accused the channel’s owner, Conde Nast, of discriminatory compensation and other practices. A Conde Nast representative said race wasn’t a factor in setting pay.
El-Waylly departed Bon Appetit in August after failed negotiations.
Her new show is her own, pushing her to deploy her talent, charm and encyclopedic culinary chops to solve challenges.
“My creativity comes from being put in difficult situations,” El-Waylly said during a break in shooting an upcoming episode.
The series riffs on a game show, with a spinning wheel that determines which challenge El-Waylly will take on.
In the second episode, in which she relies only on items purchased at a bodega to create a tasting menu, El-Waylly pours hot water over potato chips to rinse off the fat and make a mashed potato-esque puree. She expects it to “be gross.” But as she tastes it, a look of sheer satisfaction comes over her face.
Leaving Bon Appetit for an independent YouTube channel could be considered risky, but the payoffs were noticeable almost immediately. The three months it took to create the whole “Stump Sohla” series was about how long it would take to produce one Bon Appetit video, El-Waylly said, given the hurdles of working at a……

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'Babish' expands as pandemic boosts YouTube cooking shows

NEW YORK (AP) — Mac and cheese, 18th-century style. A seven-course meal using only ingredients from a convenience store. A meal that is literally on fire.
Four episodes into her new YouTube show, “Stump Sohla,” part of the expanding “Babish Culinary Universe” channel, Sohla El-Waylly has yet to be stumped by a food challenge.
El-Waylly became a familiar face on YouTube as a standout on Bon Appetit’s test kitchen channel. But during the nationwide racial reckoning following the police killing of George Floyd, she was among members of the test kitchen who accused the channel’s owner, Conde Nast, of discriminatory compensation and other practices. A Conde Nast representative said race wasn’t a factor in setting pay.
El-Waylly departed Bon Appetit in August after failed negotiations.
Her new show is her own, pushing her to deploy her talent, charm and encyclopedic culinary chops to solve challenges.
“My creativity comes from being put in difficult situations,” El-Waylly said during a break in shooting an upcoming episode.
The series riffs on a game show, with a spinning wheel that determines which challenge El-Waylly will take on.
In the second episode, in which she relies only on items purchased at a bodega to create a tasting menu, El-Waylly pours hot water over potato chips to rinse off the fat and make a mashed potato-esque puree. She expects it to “be gross.” But as she tastes it, a look of sheer satisfaction comes over her face.
Leaving Bon Appetit for an independent YouTube channel could be considered risky, but the payoffs were noticeable almost immediately. The three months it took to create the whole “Stump Sohla” series was about how long it would take to produce one Bon Appetit video, El-Waylly said, given the hurdles of working at a……

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Coronacoping: Cooking at home is a ‘thing’ again

PITTSBURGH (AP) — Fiction writer Sherrie Flick had an inkling there might be shortages of her favorite cooking and baking supplies when Pittsburgh shut down during the start of COVID-19. For the first time, she signed up for Harvie Farms Pittsburgh’s community-supported agriculture program — despite being a prolific home gardener.
“They tend to have things sooner than my home garden,” the South Side resident explained, and as a vegetarian, she couldn’t do without those staples.
She also anticipated a run on canning jars and turned a laundry and tool room into a makeshift pantry in which to store all the nuts, flour, rice and other grains she’d bought in quantity to ride out the pandemic.
But the biggest change, Flick said, was buying a gas grill. She and her husband, Rick, are adamant charcoal grillers. Yet with infections still on the rise, “It was so clear to me that we’re not leaving this house until 2021,” she said. An outdoor kitchen would ease that pain.
Call it COVID-coping, or doing what needs to be done when you’re suddenly tasked with preparing every meal at home for months on end.
Home cooking is on the rise nationwide, whether people are naturals in the kitchen or not. As a result, grocery purchases have soared, both in stores and online. Food retail jumped by more than 25% in March compared to February, according to the 2020 U.S. Grocery Shopper Trends report. In April, it remained more than 10% higher than pre-pandemic levels.
Before coronavirus, about 54% of all food dollars were spent away from the home, said Heather Garlich, senior vice president of communications for Food Industry Association. During the pandemic — with restaurants shuttered and people afraid to eat out — it’s been effectively split between groceries and……

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