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Cocktails get the home treatment in several new books

Cocktails are having a moment, and because of the pandemic, that moment is happening most often at home.

Many restaurants have responded with cocktails to go, approved in more than 30 states, according to the Distilled Spirits Council, an industry trade group. Liquor stores offer cocktails-in-a-can, like those from Canteen and Cutwater, as well as hard seltzers and more.

But there’s also been a rise in home bartending, with a number of books on the subject released in the past six months.

Unlike the often complicated cocktail books of the past, these five offerings by new-to-the-cocktail-world authors are written specifically for the home cook/bartender. Each aims to help you experience craft cocktails at home without having to get a Ph.D. in mixology.

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“Beautiful Booze: Stylish Cocktails to Make at Home” (Countryman Press) is written by Natalie Migliarini and James Stevenson, who left Seattle five years ago to travel and document the world of wine, beer, spirits and liqueurs. The inviting and glamorous photographs were shot in a rented apartment in New Orleans.

The book grew from a blog of the same name, and the recipes are simple (often three ingredients), visually appealing and refined. The authors renamed classic cocktails and gave them a witty twist for a book that is as much fun to read as it is to drink from.

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John DeBary worked for years in the New York City bar business. He is a wine and spirits writer and also launched the non-alcoholic aperitif Proteau about a year before the release of his book, “Drink What You Want: The Subjective Guide to Making Objectively Delicious Cocktails” (Clarkson Potter). The title resonates with me because I have always given the same advice, regardless of the recommended pairings.

DeBary offers recipes for both…

This post was originally published on this site

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